Coronavirus (COVID-19)

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Coronavirus (COVID-19)

We're here to help you with your learning during the COVID-19 lockdown.   |   Our flexible evidence approach enables students to meet requirements for the Education and Training qualifications.   |   Sign up to our mailing list to get access to exclusive offers! 

Our Articles

  • GIBBS – REFLECTIVE CYCLE MODEL (1988)

    GIBBS – REFLECTIVE CYCLE MODEL (1988)

    Gibbs’ Reflective cycle model is used in various situations and is useful in evaluating it. Reflection is used to improve understanding and proof of practice-based learning. It is regarded as a valuable instrument to use after critical occurrences have jumped out to help practitioners and let pupils reflect on encounters and create new learning and form new ideas.

  • THE JOHARI WINDOW

    THE JOHARI WINDOW

    The Johari Window is a psychological tool developed by Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham in 1955, while researching group dynamics at the University of California (Luft, J. & Ingham, H.1955). The name itself has is a merger of the first names of the two psychologists and was initially called JoHari Window. It is widely popular because of its simplicity and practicality for self-awareness, personal development, group development and understanding relationships.

  • DETERMINING AND QUESTIONING COGNITIVE STYLE (SADLER-SMITH)

    DETERMINING AND QUESTIONING COGNITIVE STYLE (SADLER-SMITH)

    Sadler-Smith (2001) wrote a detailed paper to investigate the notion of innovation in cognitive style. Cognitive style may be defined as an individual’s inherent way of organising and processing information. It is independent of cognitive ability and may have an important bearing on individual performance within and across organisational settings, for example in the areas of vocational and occupational preferences, management competence, performance, training, development and organisational learning. The best style becomes more habitual and observable behaviour.

  • HONEY AND MUMFORD LEARNING STYLES

    HONEY AND MUMFORD LEARNING STYLES

    Honey and Mumford learning styles were developed by Peter Honey and Alan Mumford in 1986. Their work is inspired from and built upon Kolb’s learning styles model (Leaver, 2005). however, they produced their own Learning Styles Questionnaire (LSQ) because it was found that Kolb’s LSI had low validity with managers.

  • ALTERNATIVE NAMES FOR COURSES IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING

    ALTERNATIVE NAMES FOR COURSES IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING

    Isn’t it so confusing when you’re searching for a course and there are so many different names? We’ve tried to clear the confusion with this info-graphic.

    Course names change almost every year according to the way people search for the courses. It is recommended that you go through this particular infographic to see which name is used for each course now.

  • LEARNING PREFERENCES DEPENDENT ON CONTEXT (ENTWISTLE)

    LEARNING PREFERENCES DEPENDENT ON CONTEXT (ENTWISTLE)

    J. Entwistle and Ramsden (1983) have jointly built upon Martin and Saljo (1976)’s work to establish three learning approaches described below. Entwistle (1991) further refined his research to include that each of these learning approaches are used interchangeably by students according to the context of their learning. A teacher’s behaviour and attitude, the course being studied, and other environmental and situational factors form a large part of this context.