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  • David Kolb’s Learning Styles & Experiential Learning Cycle

    David Kolb’s Learning Styles & Experiential Learning Cycle

    David Kolb ’s learning styles model was developed from his experiential learning cycle theory in 1984. These theories have largely to do with the inner cognitive processes of one’s mind. Kolb believes that effective learning occurs by a cyclic process of experiencing, reflecting, thinking, and acting; which he elaborates through his 4-stage experiential learning cycle theory (1974).

  • Gibbs – Reflective Cycle Model (1988)

    Gibbs – Reflective Cycle Model (1988)

    Gibbs’ Reflective cycle model is used in various situations and is useful in evaluating it. Reflection is used to improve understanding and proof of practice-based learning. It is regarded as a valuable instrument to use after critical occurrences have jumped out to help practitioners and let pupils reflect on encounters and create new learning and form new ideas.

  • The Johari Window

    The Johari Window

    The Johari Window is a psychological tool developed by Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham in 1955, while researching group dynamics at the University of California (Luft, J. & Ingham, H.1955). The name itself has is a merger of the first names of the two psychologists and was initially called JoHari Window. It is widely popular because of its simplicity and practicality for self-awareness, personal development, group development and understanding relationships.

  • Determining and Questioning Cognitive Style (Sadler-Smith)

    Determining and Questioning Cognitive Style (Sadler-Smith)

    Sadler-Smith (2001) wrote a detailed paper to investigate the notion of innovation in cognitive style. Cognitive style may be defined as an individual’s inherent way of organising and processing information. It is independent of cognitive ability and may have an important bearing on individual performance within and across organisational settings, for example in the areas of vocational and occupational preferences, management competence, performance, training, development and organisational learning. The best style becomes more habitual and observable behaviour.

  • Honey and Mumford Learning Styles

    Honey and Mumford Learning Styles

    Honey and Mumford learning styles were developed by Peter Honey and Alan Mumford in 1986. Their work is inspired from and built upon Kolb’s learning styles model (Leaver, 2005). however, they produced their own Learning Styles Questionnaire (LSQ) because it was found that Kolb’s LSI had low validity with managers.

  • Director ELN Chosen as Mentor for Cherie Blair Foundation
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    Director ELN Chosen as Mentor for Cherie Blair Foundation

    “Mentorship is all about serving and sharing the experiences with mentees to help them evolve in their respective ventures and to assist them in domains where they seek improvement. The idea is to showing mentees that there are choices that can be made which will make a difference in their lives. It’s about a learning opportunity for both and for helping the mentee achieve their best potential.”